September 21, 2018

How to Make a Superannuation Contribution

It’s important to start saving for your retirement as early as possible. Personal super contributions are what you contribute to your superannuation from your net salary or after-tax income. If you’re employed, these contributions are added to your super alongside from the compulsory super contributions from your employer.

In this article, find out how to make a superannuation contribution:

  • Make sure you have your Tax File Number (TFN) as your super fund needs it to accept your personal super contributions.
  • Remember the date: June 30 every year. Your personal contributions must be in your super fund so you can receive a government co-contribution for that financial year.
  • You don’t have to make your personal contributions at one time, you can make payments throughout the financial year. You can use a superannuation calculator to give you estimates on the amount of contributions.
  • Most funds provide several options to make a payment including direct debit, through your bank account and BPAY.
  • You can also make super contributions regularly into your super account from your net salary. However, if the contributions are from your before-tax salary, these are called salary-sacrificed contributions.

Relying on employer contributions alone will not be sufficient to keep your lifestyle up once you stop working.

The good thing is, there are ways to boost your super:

  • You can make concessional super contributions. If you are employed, you can discuss with your employer a portion of your pre-tax salary that can serve as an extra contribution, also called a salary sacrifice.  Concessional super contributions are limited to $25,000 per financial year, which means that the total salary sacrifice contributions must not be more than $25,000 annually.
  • You can also make non-concessional super contributions. All you have to do is deposit money directly into your super. Unlike the salary sacrifice where payment is done before your salary is taxed, the non-concessional contributions involve money where tax is already paid.
  • If your salary is less than $51,813 per year before tax and you make super contributions after tax, you can boost your super with government co-contributions. For every $1 contribution, the government will contribute 50c, and the maximum co-contribution is $500 if your salary is less than $36,813.
  • If you are self-employed or have varying work patterns, you can claim tax deductions from your personal after-tax super contributions.
  • If your salary is $37,000 or less, you may be eligible to get a low income superannuation tax offset of up to $500 every year from the government. This is the 15% of the concessional contributions from you or your employer during the financial year.

Do you have other ideas on superannuation in Australia? Share your insights in the comments section.

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