Savings .com.au

Update resultsUpdate
LenderSavings AccountBase Interest Rate Max Interest Rate Total Interest Earned Introductory Term Minimum Amount Maximum Amount Minimum Monthly Deposit Minimum Opening Deposit ATM Access Joint Application TagsFeaturesLinkCompare
0.50% p.a.
Bonus rate of 4.85%
Conditions apply.
5.35% p.a.
$1,097
$1
$50,000
$500
$1
  • Maximum Age - 24
2.00% p.a.
Bonus rate of 3.20%
Conditions apply.
5.20% p.a.
$1,065
$0
$30,000
$$formattedMinMonthlyDep.format("%,d",$!{product.minimumMonthlyDeposit})
$0
2.60% p.a.
Bonus rate of 2.40%
Conditions apply.
5.00% p.a.
$1,023
$0
$50,000
$1
$0
2.00% p.a.
Bonus rate of 3.00%
Conditions apply.
5.00% p.a.
$1,023
$0
$99,999,999
$$formattedMinMonthlyDep.format("%,d",$!{product.minimumMonthlyDeposit})
$0
0.10% p.a.
Bonus rate of 4.95%
Conditions apply.
5.05% p.a.
$1,034
$1
$99,999,999
$5
$0
0.01% p.a.
Bonus rate of 4.99%
Conditions apply.
5.00% p.a.
$1,023
$1
$99,999,999
$10
$0
0.10% p.a.
Bonus rate of 4.85%
Conditions apply.
4.95% p.a.
$1,013
$0
$50,000
$10
$0
1.25% p.a.
Bonus rate of 3.75%
Conditions apply.
5.00% p.a.
$1,023
$1
$50,000
$0
$0
Bonus rate of 5.00%
Conditions apply.
5.00% p.a.
$1,023
$0
$99,999,999
$10
$0
0.75% p.a.
Bonus rate of 3.75%
Conditions apply.
4.50% p.a.
$919
$$formattedMinimumAmount.format("%,d",$!{product.minimumAmount})
$99,999,999
$20
$0
0.95% p.a.
Bonus rate of 3.50%
Conditions apply.
4.45% p.a.
$908
$0
$99,999,999
$20
$0
4.40% p.a.
4.40% p.a.
$898
$2,000
$99,999,999
$0
$0
More savings accounts
Important Information and Comparison Rate Warning

All products with a link to a product provider’s website have a commercial marketing relationship between us and these providers. These products may appear prominently and first within the search tables regardless of their attributes and may include products marked as promoted, featured or sponsored. The link to a product provider’s website will allow you to get more information or apply for the product. By de-selecting “Show online partners only” additional non-commercialised products may be displayed and re-sorted at the top of the table. For more information on how we’ve selected these “Sponsored”, “Featured” and “Promoted” products, the products we compare, how we make money, and other important information about our service, please click here. Rates correct as of . View disclaimer.

Introducing your children to the value of money and healthy financial habits has the potential to set them up for life. It can help them to develop basic financial literacy foundations, such as understanding the value of money and learning how to manage savings better.

Savings accounts for children encourage your child to put away money weekly, fortnightly or monthly - rewarding them with bonus interest if certain conditions are met.

You may spend $5 on a cup of coffee from a café throughout your working day, however putting as little as $5 a week into a high interest savings account at 3.00% p.a. interest for 18 years would lead to a healthy balance of $6,195 with $1,515 in interest earned. The magic of compound interest is an underrated asset that is great for children to learn from a young age.


How does a savings account work for my child?

Children’s savings accounts usually have much higher interest rates than adult savings accounts to encourage kids to build up their savings when they’re young. These higher interest rates usually revert to a standard interest rate once the child turns 18.

Children's savings accounts may have strict conditions that need to be met, such as depositing a certain amount each month and not making any withdrawals to earn the bonus interest rate.

To be eligible for a children’s savings account, applicants are typically required to be under the age of 18 although age restrictions vary from bank-to-bank.


How to choose a children’s savings account?

A competitive interest rate

Children’s savings accounts generally have much higher interest rates than the interest rates on adults savings accounts, so you should look for the highest rate you can find. Keep in mind that you may have to meet certain conditions to earn the maximum interest rate each month, such as depositing a certain amount and not making any withdrawals. Balance caps may also apply, meaning the top interest rate can only be earned on balances up to a certain amount.

Minimal fees

Children’s bank accounts usually don’t have many high ongoing fees but you should still look out for any monthly account keeping fees, withdrawal fees, overdraw fees, transaction fees, ATM access fees and so on.

Low minimum opening deposit

Children’s bank accounts generally shouldn’t have a high minimum opening balance due to the fact that the account belongs to a child - and most children aren’t swimming in money.

According to Savings.com.au research, a small number of children’s savings accounts require a minimum opening deposit of between $1-$5, while the vast majority have no minimum opening deposit. Instead, some banks make up for this by having a minimum monthly deposit requirement for earning the maximum interest rate.

High maximum amount

Another thing to keep an eye out for when comparing children’s savings accounts is the maximum amount of money that can be kept in the account. For example, some children’s savings accounts have a maximum amount of $5,000, while other children’s savings accounts have maximum amounts of $20,000 to $50,000 and $99,9999.

Depending on how much money your child wants to save, it may be better to look for a savings account with a higher maximum amount.

Educational resources

Some banks provide free resources to teach children good money habits such as how to budget and save through online activities, videos, games and banking apps. These resources can make learning about money fun for children and give them the tools to make smart financial decisions as they grow up.

See also: Should financial literacy be taught in schools?


What are the advantages and disadvantages of a children’s savings account?

Advantages

  • Some children’s savings accounts may earn more interest than adults savings accounts. Depending on the account, you may have to meet certain criteria such as not making any withdrawals to earn the bonus interest rate.

  • Children’s savings accounts generally don’t have have ongoing fees.

  • You can teach your child how to save money and budget from an early age, especially if your bank provides free educational resources.

  • If you’re so inclined, you can even open up a bank account for your baby to start saving money as early as possible and take advantage of that compounding interest.

Disadvantages

  • Children’s savings accounts have age limits. The age limit differs from bank to bank, and can start from the age of 12, however most have an age limit of 18. When your child reaches this age, they will no longer be eligible for the account and the account will be automatically converted to a regular savings account.

  • There are tax implications. If your child is under the age of 16 and earns between $120 and $420 in interest from their savings account and they don’t provide either their tax file number or date of birth, the bank will withhold pay as you go (PAYG) tax at 47% and the child will need to lodge a tax return if they want a refund - obviously this is something a parent will need to do for the child.

  • Some children's savings accounts have balance caps, meaning the top interest rate can only be earned on balances up to a certain amount.


Are there any traps to look out for?

Tax implications

If your child’s savings account is earning interest, the Australian Taxation Office (ATO) has strict guidelines.

If the parent provides the money for their child’s savings account and uses it as they wish (such as spending the money on piano lessons for their kid), any interest earned is considered to belong to the parent and the parent must declare that interest in their tax return.

But if the child is depositing their own money into the account, such as pocket money, Christmas or birthday money, or income they have earned from casual jobs, any interest earned is considered to belong to the child so long as the money isn’t spent by anyone else. If the child earns less than $120 in interest for the financial year, no tax will be withheld and they won’t have to file a tax return.

However, if the child is under the age of 16 and earns more than $420 in interest for the financial year, they will have to provide their Tax File Number (TFN) to avoid being taxed on that amount. If the child doesn’t provide their TFN, the financial institution will withhold pay as you go (PAYG) tax at 47% and the child will need to lodge a tax return if they want a refund.

The high interest rate is tempting, but it’s not for you Mum or Dad!

It may be tempting to put your savings in your child’s savings account to take advantage of the high interest rate that you can’t get on your own account, but don’t. The ATO has very strict tax guidelines in place to govern the funds being held in your kids account to prevent parents from sneakily hiding their own savings in there.

With a number of term deposit rates continuing to grow month on month, parents may look to take advantage of a high interest term deposit to benefit their own saving goals. 

Always read the T's and C's

Before taking out any financial product, be sure to read the terms and conditions. An interest rate may look really high, but are there any conditions that need to be met in order to earn the maximum interest rate? Do balance caps apply? You should also check what the interest rate reverts to once your child turns a specific age. What looks like a really competitive rate right now may not be so great later on.


Savings.com.au’s two cents

If you want to provide your child with a sufficient financial head start, opening a high interest savings account for them is the first step towards teaching them how to be financially literate.

The key takeaway here is to look for a savings account with the highest interest rate you can find, but you should also remember that there may be certain conditions that need to be met each month in order to earn the maximum interest rate.

By opening up a high interest savings account for your child and making regular deposits, you’re giving them a great financial start thanks to the power of compounding interest. Not only are you giving them a good financial head start in life, you’ll also be teaching them valuable money lessons and giving them the tools to become financially literate adults.